30-Day Home Workout Plan

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Too much time and too much money. Those are the two reasons I hear most often when I ask people why they don’t exercise. Here’s a free, 30-minute workout that you can do in the comfort of your own home and still get the results you are looking for.

Workout 1:
Squats Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Walking Lunges Reps: 16 Sets: 4

Side Squat Reps: 20 Sets: 4

Fire Hydrants Reps: 15 Sets: 4 (each leg)

Kickbacks Reps: 15 Sets: 4 (each leg)

Jumping Jacks Reps: 30 Sets: 4

Workout 2:

Modified Push-ups Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Dips Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Biceps Curls Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Lateral Raises Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Planks Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Jump Rope 5 minutes

Workout 3:

Cardio 30 minutes

Examples: Treadmill, elliptical, outdoor jog, swim, hike, etc.

Workout 4:

Frog Squats Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Lateral Leg Raises Reps: 15 Sets: 4 (each leg)

Reverse Lunges Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Lying Hip Ext. Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Jump Squats Reps: 10 Sets: 3

Jumping Jacks Reps: 30 Sets: 4

Workout 5:

Modified Push-ups Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Dumbbell Overhead Triceps Ext. Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Bent Over Dumbbell Rows Reps: 10 Sets: 4 (each arm)

Dips Reps: 15 Sets: 4

Floor Chest Press Reps: 10 Sets: 4

Jump Rope 5 minutes

Workout 6:

Cardio 30 minutes

Workout 7:

Crunches Reps: 20 Sets: 4

Leg Lifts Reps: 12 Sets: 4

Bicycles Reps: 20 Sets: 4

Sit-ups Reps: 15 Sets: 4

Jump Rope 10 minutes

Repeat this workout for 4 weeks. Be sure to check out my article on the 5 Best Post-Workout Foods to make sure you get the most out of your workouts!

5 Best Post-Workout Foods

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As you’ve probably heard before, eating after a workout is crucial to getting the most out of your time spent at the gym. Here are the of the top five post-workout foods:

1. Smoothies

Tasty and refreshing, a fruit smoothie is a great recovery food. While stopping at your local smoothie king is a great option if you’re pressed for time, your best bet is to make your own.Try this recipe: 1/2 cup 1 percent milk, 2 tablespoons low-fat plain yogurt, 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, 1/2 banana, 1/4 cup strawberries, 1/4 cup cubed ripe mango, 2 teaspoons vanilla whey powder & 3 ice cubes. This smoothie contains 154 calories, 31 grams of carbs, 7 grams of protein and 2 grams of fat.

2. Whey

Tasty and refreshing, a fruit smoothie is a great recovery food. While stopping at your local smoothie king is a great option if you’re pressed for time, your best bet is to make your own.Try this recipe: 1/2 cup 1 percent milk, 2 tablespoons low-fat plain yogurt, 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, 1/2 banana, 1/4 cup strawberries, 1/4 cup cubed ripe mango, 2 teaspoons vanilla whey powder & 3 ice cubes. This smoothie contains 154 calories, 31 grams of carbs, 7 grams of protein and 2 grams of fat.

3. Yogurt

Yogurt is an excellent source of protein and calcium and is low in fat when made with fat-free or low-fat milk. Yogurt provides the necessary carbohydrates and proteins the body needs after a workout, and doesn’t contribute any dietary fat or excessive calories.

4. Chocolate Milk

Drinking water replaces your sweat loss, that’s it, chocolate milk is a serious muscle-recovery beverage that performs just as well as any sports drink or shake out there. The high-quality protein and fast-digesting carbohydrates in chocolate milk promote the release of insulin from your pancreas. High levels of insulin promotes muscle growth and shuttles nutrients into muscle, which can enhance recovery.

5. Eggs

Egg protein is considered to be the most readily utilizable protein with the highest biological value of all whole foods. This translates to muscle growth and fast muscle recovery.

5 ‘Bro Science’ Myths

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We’re all looking to maximize results while minimizing time and effort in the gym, right? That search for shortcuts has translated into a ton of myths about exercise. The following are the top 5 6 exercise myths I’ve come across over the past couple years.

1. Crunches flatten your stomach.

Absolutely FALSE! Crunches alone won’t flatten your stomach, because there are no exercises to reduce fat in specific areas of your body.

You can’t spot reduce. Your body decides where to store fat, and a lot of that is based on your genetics.

The best way to get a flat stomach is to burn calories to reduce fat in the first place. Crunches will tone areas, but won’t reduce the fat there on their own.

Crunches are by no means bad, they do burn calories, so performing large numbers of them daily will contribute to weight loss but not as effectively as cardio and eating right.

2. When you stop working out your muscle turns to fat.

They are two different types of tissue, muscle doesn’t turn into fat and fat doesn’t turn into muscle.

This myth probably originated from people seeing toned, muscular athletes (i.e. Arnold Schwarzenegger) develop rolls with age.

When you stop working out, you rapidly lose muscle and gain fat, potentially giving the appearance that muscle is turning into fat. Muscle can literally turn into fat, but you only see it in some extreme circumstances.

If you don’t want to get fat, here’s a solution that never fails… KEEP HITTING THE GYM!

3. Heart rate monitors will let you know how hard you’re working.

Heart rate monitoring is a flawed science.

The better detector of how hard you’re working is your body.

The talk test is one I like to do with my clients, it can measure how intensely you’re working out depending on whether you can talk in full sentences, short phrases or if you’re barely able to muster a few words.

4. Stretch before exercising or you’ll injure yourself.

The biggest myth of them all!

The most recent studies have found that stretching will not help you avoid injury. Stretching does not affect muscle compliance during *eccentric activity when most strains are believed to occur.

Also stretching, regardless of form, does not reduce muscle soreness. Another myth busted within a myth.

If you’re feeling a little tight before a workout your best bet is to warm up for 5-10 minutes with some light cardio.

5. Women who weight train get bulky.

If I had a nickel for every time I heard this in the gym…

This myth is annoying and far from the truth.

Men who work out a lot may bulk up, but that is because of the anabolic testosterone that men’s bodies produce. The average woman, therefore, should not be worried.

Women who do strength training may gain some mass, but will lose an equivalent amount of mass in fat. So basically you’re trading fat for muscle.

Who wouldn’t make that trade!

6. If you’re physically fit that means you’re healthy.

I know the title said 5 myths but I couldn’t leave this one out; and 5 sounds better than 6.

While being physically fit and being healthy are closely linked, they are not synonymous.

Many young people, especially in their 20s, stay thin without exercising but are one doughnut away from being diagnosed with diabetes. Contrary to popular belief thin people CAN (say it with my skinny folk, C-A-N) benefit from exercise, which combats physical conditions as well as mental conditions, like depression.

Also, people with type 1 diabetes or people who have recently suffered heart attacks or strokes can better manage their illnesses if they’re in good shape.

*Eccentric activity is where the muscle is contracting, and an external force is trying to lengthen the muscle (ex. bicep curls).